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Leadership: Push or Pull Technique

By Matthew King

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Matthew King 2 months ago.

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  • #4959

    Matthew King
    Keymaster

    This is a question and a discussion on a topic I feel is pretty controversial even in my own office. There are many different management techniques and leadership styles that exist in a work environment especially the bigger the business gets. I have my own employee management style and leadership that I have developed while working with others. I’ll talk about the technique that I prefer to use and which one I prefer not to see myself.

    My favorite leadership technique I simply call the “Pull” technique, there may be other words for it but this is how I think of it. When you need an employee to do something you have a chance to pull them to what you need done or push them to what you need done. An example of “pulling” would be to ask them to do a project then lend a helping hand to complete the project with them or lead by doing the project yourself before turning it over to completed. An example of “pushing” would simply be telling them to do it with no expectation of training them, aiding them, showing them, or leading them; just having them do the work simply because you told them to.

    I find this philosophy and style to be a bit repulsive. During my times of being employed by others I always found my pride in my work when I enjoyed working with the employer. When I felt my work was appreciated and I was being lead a specific way, not demanded because I’m the boss mentality. When I was approached with a “I’m the boss, do what I told you because I said so” mentality it often showed in my dedication to the task at hand or the quality in the work that was completed.

    This is why I believe that a “pull” type of mentality should be used most often. Employees that earn your respect are more willing to work with you and pour in dedication, pride, and their time than employees who have to respect you.

    What are your thoughts on this type of leadership? Do any of you thing that it should be a “push” type relationship at all times? What are some examples where you have been the employee and respected or worked harder due to the leadership in your work environment?

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  • #506217

    Ali
    Participant
    • Total Post: 2
    Points: 19

    Push and Pull is in every type of relationship. Usually this means the “I’ versus the “We”. Individualism versus the group. Which in this case one doesn’t like to be dominated, controlled, not heard, disrespected, and often the employee will naturally pull away from this interaction. Individualism is ego centered. Where “We” work together as a team, can sit down together and discuss various options. What works best for the greater good of the company or the whole group.

    You have to understand the difference between Authoritarian (Extrovert) leaders and Authoritative (Introvert) leaders. One is short-term gains, in the now, and take action. The other is long-term gains, and the bigger picture. The visionary.

    Often, we must learn personality to understand the push and pull dynamic. As Introverts don’t really like conflict, and Extroverts love conflict. The Tough Love approach of “Break the Will” and “Break them Down”, and we’ll build you up.

    No matter the personality type, we always bounce and back and forth between interacting with Introverts and Extroverts.

    This also comes down to what one fears. Entrepreneurship pushes you to your limits. It pushes you to get past your self-limiting beliefs. When you fear something of course you pull away and take the least path of resistance.

    • #506250

      Matthew King
      Keymaster
      • Total Post: 86
      Points: 1,155

      I appreciate your insight on this Ali. What do you find works for your group the best?

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